2022 Pulitzer Prize for photojournalism announced, lens is the most honest documentarian

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2022-05-27 13:31:00

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Photographer:Danish Siddiqui


In early May, the 106th annual Pulitzer Prizes for journalism (The Pulitzer Prizes) announced the winners of the 2022 awards.
The Pulitzer Prizes have long been known as the "Oscars of Journalism," and among the 21 categories in which they are awarded, the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography and the Breaking News Photography are the most prestigious. These two photojournalism awards were originally one and the same, founded in 1942 and only split in two in 1968. This year marks the 80th anniversary of the award, and next month Taipei will be the first to host a three-month exhibition entitled "SHOOTING - The 80th Anniversary of the Pulitzer Prize for Photojournalism". From 80 years ago to the present, photography technology has been constantly upgraded, human life has been changing, and photographers have captured the world's events with instantaneous images.


01

Vivid and dripping breaking news scene

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Photographer:Drew Angerer、Samuel Corum、Win McNamee


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Photographer:Marcus Yam


The Pulitzer Prize for On-Site Photojournalism recognizes outstanding breaking news photography, often by photographers who have gone into the thick of the action to deliver the most visceral impact, often on events that had a profound impact on the world that year.
The 2022 Pulitzer Prize for Live Photojournalism was awarded to five Getty Images photographers for their work on the 2021 U.S. presidential election attack on the Capitol, and to Marcus Yam, a Los Angeles Times foreign correspondent and contributing photographer, for his work documenting the evacuation of U.S. troops from Afghanistan. The other was the Los Angeles Times foreign correspondent and contributing photographer Marcus Yam's on-the-ground account of the evacuation of U.S. troops from Afghanistan, which was moved by the jury from the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography to the list of winners of the Pulitzer Prize for Live Photojournalism.
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Photographer:Jon Cherry


The first of 15 pictures of the award-winning attack on the U.S. Capitol captures Joseph Biggs in a plaid shirt leading his group, The Proud Boys, as they gather on the east side of the Capitol, where dark clouds are already gathering.

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Photographer:Samuel Corum


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Photographer:Win McNamee


Police tried to prevent the eviction of the protesters, but they continued to break through the defense line at the east entrance of the building.

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Photographer:Win McNamee


Photographer Win McNamee captured this fleeting image of protester Nicholas Rodean waving a red flag that reads "Trump is my president" as he descends the stairs near the Senate chamber. The large painting clearly visible behind him is from the 1865 painting "The Battle of Lake Erie" by American painter William Henry Powell, which is seen as a symbol of American victory.

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Photographer:Win McNamee


Win McNamee's photograph also captures two famous paintings, "Surrender of General Burgoyne," top left, and "Surrender of Lord Cornwallis," top right, with protester Adam Johnson clutching the Speaker of the House's lectern as he prepares to leave between the famous paintings, the whole scene looking comical.

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Photographer:Win McNamee


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Photographer:Drew Angerer


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Photographer:Drew Angerer


The entire set is filled with the most chaotic moments, with police confronting protesters and police covering the departure of congressmen from the building.

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Photographer:Win McNamee


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Photographer:Jon Cherry


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Photographer:Spencer Platt


Several close-ups of people are also very tense, the first one of Jacob Chansley shouting "freedom" in the House of Representatives with his oiled face, and the second one seems to feel the anger of hammering the windows.

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Last year, as Afghanistan came under global scrutiny and the U.S. military hastily withdrew from the country after 20 years of stalemate under a Taliban offensive, Seattle-based photographer Marcus Yam captured rare on-the-spot photography documenting the complexities of the various people on the ground, also in a set of 15 photographs.

The first photo, taken from an elevated perspective, captures a military transport plane flying over the heads of Emal Ahmadi and his family and relatives. They are gathered around a burned-out car that was previously parked in a neighborhood in the capital, Kabul, when it was mistakenly attacked by a U.S. drone, killing no Taliban militants but 10 civilians, including seven children, by accident.


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These two child-related views are also heartbreaking, as a man carries his bloodied child to Kabul airport, next to another boy with a pained face. At a checkpoint near the airport entrance, women and children crouch in the hot sun waiting to be checked out of Afghanistan.

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The visual impact is also strong in this one, back to the camera is from the Afghan media "Etilaat Roz" of two journalists Nemat Naqdi and Taqi Daryabi, because they reported on the Afghan women for the rights of the protest rally by the Taliban armed with severe beatings, the wound is shocking.

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This piece features Afghan female activist Laila Haidari, who was forced to close her cafe Taj Begum last August, saying "it was a place where all women with wounds could talk to each other, a cafe that touched many people and gave them a new lease on life. Taj Begum used to be a cultural fulcrum in Kabul, but has now become "a victim of the new order created by the Taliban.

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In Marcus Yam's footage, there are passengers watching Taliban soldiers on patrol, the outrage of anti-Taliban protesters, the pain of victims of suicide bombings, and Taliban soldiers temporarily laying down their weapons for evening prayers. The photographer's record of this particular period is vivid and dripping, and he says his goal has always been to bring viewers at this end of the screen to the front lines of conflict, struggle and secret affairs.

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Photographer:Anonymous freelance writer for the New York Times


A finalist for this year's Pulitzer Prize in Live Photojournalism is also worth a look. This is a set of photographs of the military coup in Burma taken by an anonymous freelance writer for The New York Times, in which the photographer risked great personal risk to capture the scene of violent conflict, life and death.


02

Life and death of the epidemic life daily

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Photographer:Sanna Irshad Mattoo、Danish Siddiqui、Adnan Abidi


The Pulitzer Prize for Close-Up Photography, a feature photography consisting of multiple photographs, was awarded this year to a group of four Reuters photographers for their images of life in India during the epidemic, which was also removed from the shortlist for the Pulitzer Prize for On-Site Photojournalism, which the jury said "balances intimacy and devastation while providing the viewer with a heightened sense of place.

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Photographer:Danish Siddiqui


The first picture of the group brings a strong visual impact, the camera focuses on the Kumbh Mela festival in India's Hariva, a naked Hindu ascetic (Naga Sadhu) before entering the Ganges River sacred bath, put on a mask. The festival was held last April, and during April-May, India saw an explosion of cases, with many patients suffocating in hospitals due to oxygen shortages.
The photo was taken by India-based Reuters chief photographer Danish Siddiqui, who also won a Pulitzer Prize for close-up photography in 2018 and who died last year while covering the conflict in Afghanistan on the Pakistani border.

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Photographer:Amit Dave


This one also exemplifies what the jury described as a "high sense of place," with a woman's temperature being taken by medical staff at a brick kiln on the outskirts of Hammedabad, India, in a colorful outfit and sari that has a strong regional character and a colorful clash with the obscure epidemic environment in the other photos.

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Photographer:Danish Siddiqui


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Photographer:Adnan Abidi


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Photographer:Danish Siddiqui


Almost half of the photos in the entire set are related to death, with families crying over the death of a man with a COVID-19; relatives in protective clothing hugging and comforting each other at a cremation ceremony; and a 19-year-old boy kneeling with his head buried in front of his mother's body.

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Photographer:Adnan Abidi


A corpse lies on the cremation woodpile, behind which is the blazing fire of mass cremation. In this group of works, in addition to the painful farewell of loved ones, there are some dead people whose first and last names are not even known, and they become a number on the statistical list of deaths, but in the camera, their lives seem to be not far away.

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Photographer:Adnan Abidi


At a crematorium in New Delhi, Ashish Kashyap and Naman Sharma, volunteers for a nonprofit organization, are carrying bags full of ashes from some of the COVID-19 dead that have gone unclaimed.

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Photographer:Danish Siddiqui


Also at the crematorium in New Delhi, these small boxes containing urns and bags of ashes are waiting to be immersed in the Ganges River to complete the last rites.

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Photographer:Danish Siddiqui


An aerial view of the mass cremation of the COVID-19 dead, the flaming crematorium is in stark contrast to the quiet residential area next to it, a wall away.

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Photographer:Adnan Abidi


In a village on India's northern edge, where cases are surging, a man is guarding his feverish wife, who has to be given fluids at a makeshift clinic due to limited medical care, with the bottle hanging from a drab stucco wall.


03

The camera is the most honest news recorder


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▲ Exhibition details can be found on the official website:https://lihi1.com/qUzUg


The above award-winning photographs will be exhibited first in the "SHOOTING - 80th Anniversary of the Pulitzer Prize for Photojournalism" exhibition, in addition to the 138 works that have won the Pulitzer Prize for Photojournalism over the years. The exhibition will also feature a special section on "The World Under the Epidemic", which is sure to receive a lot of attention.
The exhibition looks back through the lens of 80 years of news issues, large and small, and the award-winning works of the past are an honest record of the international events of that year.

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Photographer:Emilio Morenatti


Most of the winners in the last two years were related to the epidemic, and the 2021 Pulitzer Prize for Close-Up Photography went to Emilio Morenatti of the Associated Press, who captured the heartbreaking state of the elderly in Spain during the epidemic.

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Photographer:John Minchillo


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Photographer:Ringo H.W. Chiu


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Photographer:Noah Berger(up)、Julio Cortez(down)


Last year's Pulitzer Prize for Live Photojournalism, also won by the Associated Press, is a collection of photos from several U.S. cities that capture the reaction of people in the country after the killing of George Floyd, with large numbers of protesters taking to the streets while others prevented protesters from launching attacks on police cars.


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Photographer:Lorenzo Tugnoli


In 2019, when many people are eager to travel back in time, the winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography is a set of photographs about the famine in Yemen, with The Washington Times' Lorenzo Tugnoli documenting the tragic world through a lens full of beauty.

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Photographer:Various Reuters photographers(Adrees Latif, Loren Elliott, Carlos Barria, Edgard Garrido, Lucy Nicholson, Carlos Garcia Rawlins, Ueslei Marcelino, Alkis Konstantinidis, Claudia Daut, Kim Kyung Hoon, Corinne Perkins, Mike Blake)


That year's Pulitzer Prize for Live Photojournalism was about migration, and Reuters photographers brought 20 photographs that "tell a vivid and startling visual narrative of the urgency, desperation and sadness of migrants as they travel from Central and South America to the United States.

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Photographer:E. Jason Wambsgans


The 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography was awarded to E. Jason Wambsgans of the Chicago Tribune for his black-and-white photograph of an 11-year-old boy who survived the Chicago shooting, Tavon Tanner, as he returns to a normal life.
In the past few years, our attention to documentary photography has increased, and at a time when words feel powerless, the camera, though silent, has a strong visual impact, announcing to the world that we will not be silent.


Article Resource:一夜美学

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